Athletes and Steroids: Their Lies And Deceptions

athletes and steroids“I take complete responsibility for taking an Over-the-counter supplement that’s banned by the NCAA,” Robertson said in a statement published Monday. “I’m paying a heavy price for an awful choice, as I shall never again wear an Iowa State uniform. I hope that my case will act as a warning to other people considering the use of dietary supplements.”

Athletes are lying to us. They’re insincere, and we all believe their deceptions. Well, the majority of us do.

You see, lots of Athletes that test positive for banned substances are blaming dietary supplements because of the cause of the positive test. Lets quickly go through the above statement and see if his action is by sheer ignorance or it was a conscious made action

Statements like these are also causing an unnecessary panic on the general public about dietary supplements. Back to Mr. Robertson’s quotation, we especially observe the expression “dietary supplements.”

A nutritional supplement is a comprehensive term, and it means tens of thousands of different kinds of products. There’s but one sort of dietary supplement which can cause a positive effect on steroid evaluations. These nutritional supplements are known as pro-hormones. Can a pro-hormone cause Mr. Robertson’s positive outcome? Maybe yes, maybe no…

Pro-hormones are Utilized to raise your body’s testosterone Levels, just such as steroids, but in a much lower impact. Any athlete that chooses a pro-hormone understands what it will. They are aware that pro-hormones are designed to elevate testosterone resulting in more extended muscle mass and more exceptional athletic performance.

In addition to this, pro-hormones say directly on the bottle something to this fact “Professional and amateur athletes subject to performance enhancing substance testing should consult with their sanctioning body prior to using this product since utilization of these might cause a reactive drug test.” Pretty clear is not it? You cannot tell me this Mr. Robertson cannot read,

Blaming a positive test on one of those products might be authentic because they could cause a positive about a steroid test. But it would also be somewhat simple to attribute a positive test on a nutritional supplement whenever the athlete has been using a steroid. Considering that the real dietary supplements are seldom made public, it’s not difficult to attribute a positive test to a nutritional supplement.

It does not create a difference because a positive test will be a Positive test, correct? Wrong. From these athletes blaming their positive test on dietary supplements instead of steroids, they’re in consequence “passing the buck” This is, they’re claiming ignorance, rather than accepting responsibility, and they’re damaging the entire multi-million dollar dietary supplement industry in the procedure.

This isn’t fine, but not just because it creates false beliefs among the general public about nutritional supplements, but also because it provides the federal government an excuse to limit further what you may purchase without a prescription.

Do you want to have to visit your doctor to find a Prescription to get a multi-vitamin? Imagine if you wished to purchase a protein supplement? Would you like to have to visit your physician for it? I didn’t believe so. Really, even much care must be observed before taking so-called safe alternative body building and fitness supplements. These athletes and their associations are becoming extremely irresponsible by using broad terms such as dietary supplements if describing positive drug tests.

The NCAA and other governing organizations ought to be pressured to reveal what specific substance that these athletes are analyzing positive. By not doing this these associations are allowing athletes to save face at the expense of a whole multi-billion buck industry.

By forcing the NCAA and other governing bodies to identify the particular substance that has been tested positive for they’d eliminate all confusion about what exactly is and isn’t the cause of positive tests.

Either that or governing bodies such as the NCAA and the media ought to be educated in the proper terminology of this dietary supplement industry. Painting reactive evaluations together with the word “dietary supplements” is inaccurate, unfair and irresponsible.

There has to Be some accountability among athletes to get their positive tests. People who test positive shouldn’t be allowed to pass on the blame on the dietary supplement industry. These athletes must be revealed for what they did. Can they choose a prohormone because they were too stupid to see the label?

Or did they simply take steroids? Recognizing that when they had been caught they might claim ignorance and attribute “tainted” nutritional supplements. We’ll never understand until the governing bodies begin naming particular substances accountable for positive tests.

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